Love Yourself - There's Nobody Like You

lightthiscandle:

Another great photo shoot from Bill Eppridge, this time of the Apollo 11 crew.

Even though these are seemingly very simple portraits, to me they reveal so much about the personality and chemistry of the crew.

for-all-mankind:

Apeepo 11 launched on 16 July, 1969 on an Apeepo-Saturn V rocket.

for-all-mankind:

Apeepo 11 launched on 16 July, 1969 on an Apeepo-Saturn V rocket.

scanzen:

Astronauts on the Moon. Children’s plates from the famous Hungarian china manufacturer, Zsolnay Porcelain Manufacture, Pécs, c1970.

just-like-it-is:

Bill Murray tells it just like it is.

just-like-it-is:

Bill Murray tells it just like it is.

1950sunlimited:

 Moon Plaque , 1969
Left behind on the moon by Apollo 11 astronauts, the plaque was stainless steel, 9 by 7 and 5/8 inches and 1/16 inch thick. 

 

1950sunlimited:

 Moon Plaque , 1969

Left behind on the moon by Apollo 11 astronautsthe plaque was stainless steel, 9 by 7 and 5/8 inches and 1/16 inch thick. 

 

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

A Map of the Apollo Landing Sites on the Moon
Apollo 11- Sea of Tranquility
Apollo 12- Ocean of Storms
Apollo 14- Fra Mauro 
Apollo 15- Hadley-Appenine
Apollo 16- Descartes Mountains
Apollo 17- Taurus-Littrow

from-the-earth-to-the-moon13:

A Map of the Apollo Landing Sites on the Moon

Apollo 11- Sea of Tranquility

Apollo 12- Ocean of Storms

Apollo 14- Fra Mauro 

Apollo 15- Hadley-Appenine

Apollo 16- Descartes Mountains

Apollo 17- Taurus-Littrow

todaysdocument:

This animation from Moonwalk One shows all the stages of the Apollo 11 mission, which launched 45 years ago on July 16, 1969.  As designed, the only component to return to Earth was the Command Module Columbia.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon

unitedbyblue:

The Original Aviator — Made in USA
Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and the entire Apollo 11 crew took these Original Pilots up to the moon back in 1969.  AO Eyewear dates back to the early 1800s and is deeply rooted in the US.  
Check them out at United By Blue

unitedbyblue:

The Original Aviator — Made in USA

Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and the entire Apollo 11 crew took these Original Pilots up to the moon back in 1969.  AO Eyewear dates back to the early 1800s and is deeply rooted in the US.  

Check them out at United By Blue

spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it. 

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA

spacehangout:

That Indescribable Feeling You get When You Gaze Back at Earth from Space

Seeing our home planet from space is one of those self-reflective experiences, like seeing yourself in a picture, or hearing your voice on tape. It tells you something about yourself from outside of yourself. It is an experience that changes your understanding of the world and your place in it.

This phenomenon is best illustrated by the words of space travelers who, upon reaching orbit, have gazed back at Earth and felt the profound impact of viewing the planet in its entirety.

Neil Armstrong, the first person to step foot on the Moon, described the feeling of perspective he experienced when staring out at the Earth from the spacecraft window: “It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn’t feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.”

William Anders (Apollo 8 mission), had this to say: “We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth.”

Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander, said, “The view of the Earth from the Moon fascinated me — a small disk, 240,000 miles away… Raging nationalistic interests, famines, wars, pestilence don’t show from that distance.”

Alan Shepard, commander of the Apollo 14 mission, the eighth manned mission to the Moon, said of the experience of seeing the home planet in its entirety, “If somebody had said before the flight, ‘Are you going to get carried away looking at the Earth from the Moon?’ I would have said, ‘No, no way.’ But yet when I first looked back at the Earth, standing on the Moon, I cried!”

Credit: NASA

(Source: facebook.com)

gr8chairmanmeow:

45 years ago today Apollo 11 landed on the moon. Three years later, in 1972, astronaut Eugene Cernan became the last man to step foot on Earth’s only natural satellite.

gr8chairmanmeow:

45 years ago today Apollo 11 landed on the moon. Three years later, in 1972, astronaut Eugene Cernan became the last man to step foot on Earth’s only natural satellite.